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Month: May 2009

George Spencer: Get it Right the First Time

George Spencer: Get it Right the First Time

Alexander Calder, 20th century neglected master, said a piece is finished when the dinner bell rings. Clearly he knew truth was ass-backward. Beethoven’s Ninth is pretty good backward too; maybe better. Poor guy, a captive of his times, pressured by the Imperial Court. He had to code his message but he should have outfaced the constabulary and started with the hosannas and cheering and work back thru the darker parts, slogging thru piles of hubris. It’s clear it’s music about a type of joy that’s temporary. Myself, I always bear this in mind. Anyway it’s finished when it’s finished, when it’s as good read backward as forward. Some agree saying put Molly Bloom at the beginning. . . . Read more. “George Spencer: Get it Right the First Time”

The Relativity of Illusion

The Relativity of Illusion

St. Francis at Prayer, by Caravaggio. 1602-06
St. Francis at Prayer, by Caravaggio. 1602-06

 From where I sit. From where you sit. It’s all relative. You’re deluded. No, you are. I think you both are. In The Great Weaver of Kashmir, the young Halldór Laxness, a future Nobel Prize winner, gives us ample opportunity as readers to judge much concerning delusions and illusions. The novel is ambiguous enough to provide plenty of room, and our weighing and balancing of the various options will have much to do with our own predilections.

Picking up where I left off a few days ago, our hero (or anti-hero), Steinn Elliði, was searching for a way to attain perfection. Thinking he found it in a monastery, he started the process of becoming a monk. . . . Read more. “The Relativity of Illusion”

Sacrificial Lines . . .

Sacrificial Lines . . .

The Great Weaver of Kashmir, by Halldór Laxness
The Great Weaver of Kashmir, by Halldór Laxness

After nearly 300 pages (with a bit more than a 100 to go), I don’t know what to make of this novel. I do know that the writing is powerful, often hallucinatory, filled with wonderful metaphors and poetic symbology. I do know it makes me think of all kinds of things: Death, Suicide, Heaven and Hell, Love, Masks, Mercurial Personalities. Nietzsche is a guiding spirit. As are the Icelandic Eddas, and the thousand and one journeys through love, hedonism, faith and beyond permeating our culture(s).

The life of a Christian ascetic is something Laxness knew first hand. And the life of a traveler. . . . Read more. “Sacrificial Lines . . .”

Almost Dionysian Almost Free

Almost Dionysian Almost Free

Penny Lane, played by Kate Hudson
Penny Lane, played by Kate Hudson

Rockers get to be Dionysian. It’s their thing. No one expects them to add the Apollonian, though they must to create music objects, or create as individual artists. They must. But the Dionysian is what their fans want, see, expect — in concerts, at least. Do they expect the same things when they sit at home, alone, listening to records of the same singer, the same band?

Right now, as of 2009, it is probably true that musicians can combine the Dionysian and the Apollonian better than any other kind of artist. Chaos, trance, inebriation, intoxication of one or more forms, group celebration and loss of the self, the dying of the self in that group celebration and swooning fall out. . . . Read more. “Almost Dionysian Almost Free”

Joyous Ode to Rock N Roll

Joyous Ode to Rock N Roll

 The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you’re uncool.

— Lester Bangs

Almost Famous is Cameron Crowe’s love song to an era, the end of that era (1973), and a back to the future call to what comes next. His film is both highly personal for him and for anyone who lost/loses themselves in music, grew up with that immersion, or dreams of a life of freedom and abandon on the road. I loved it when I first saw it in a theater 9 years ago, and again when I watched it on DVD a couple of nights ago. In fact, I liked it even more this time around. . . . Read more. “Joyous Ode to Rock N Roll”

Witness to Genesis

Witness to Genesis

 First to see. Like Billie Holiday and Benny Goodman. 1933. Debut to beat the band. To be there. To be not square there. Ella singing scat with Dizzy in the 40s. Using her voice like a horn, playing with it, like a mad cat running up and down a tree. Running up and down and all over town.

Billie wrote a lot of songs. A lot of people don’t know that. Or care. They just want to hear her sing. And, maybe feel like they’re cool for liking her, knowing about her. Yeah, it’s cool if you’re hip without pushing it. A Zen thing. A Taoist dream thing. Like, you gotta float and move fast while you’re standing still. . . . Read more. “Witness to Genesis”

Flailing Parochial Vision

Flailing Parochial Vision

Athena and Heracles, by Douris. 480-470 BC.
Athena and Heracles, by Douris. 480-470 BC.


 

Peering into the mountain
The universality of spirits
Spirits
For tens of thousands of years

Peering into the cave

It’s all there
All there is
It has been that way
Again and again

For thousands of decades
With new incarnations
Every now and then
Here and there

What makes us so sure
Ours in the only one?

What makes us so sure
Ours isn’t just one more mask?

Why would we think that our
Small corner of the world
Of time
Even the universe

Is the first the last
The only point in time
Aligned with the Great Spirit?

Why would we imagine
Nothing was on target
Before us? . . . Read more. “Flailing Parochial Vision”

Being in Time

Being in Time

Yves Tanguy's Indefinite Divisibilty. 1943
Yves Tanguy’s Indefinite Divisibilty. 1943

For those of you north of the border, for those of you planning to take a trip to Canada soon, Desi Di Nardo has a poetic treat in store. On Wednesday, May 13th, she will be holding a workshop/reading at 7:00pm.

The location is:

The McNally Robinson Bookstore

Don Mills Road at Lawrence Avenue East
12 Marie Labatte Road
Toronto, Ontario
M3C 3R6

(416) 384-0084

From the bookstore’s announcement:

Desi Di Nardo is an author and poet living in Toronto whose work has been published in numerous North American and international journals and anthologies. Her poetry has been performed at the National Arts Centre, featured in Poetry on the Way on the TTC, and displayed in the Official Residences of Canada.

. . . Read more. “Being in Time”