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Month: July 2010

The Art of Laughter

The Art of Laughter

Just finished watching The Circus, Chaplin’s wonderful film from 1928. Silence and black and white. Laughter without laugh tracks, but with Chaplin’s own score carrying us from scene to scene. Pathos comes from The Tramp. He makes us laugh and it’s deep, and meaningful, and sad. The movie made me think of my trip to Ireland in 2003, where I saw the statue above, and it seemed so incongruous there, near the strand, not in Alaska, or in some darkened woods with the hobo’s song in the air.  But then I remembered the Irish have always mixed deep sorrow and belly laughs, and everything in between. Perhaps everyone does at times. Sadness is too sad alone.

Felino Soriano doesn’t necessarily write humorous poems, and the poems below don’t strike me as being particular sad. But they do hold contradictions within them that work and elevate each other. They’re about language and the body and culture and the music of … Click to continue . . .

Approbations, by Felino A. Soriano

Approbations, by Felino A. Soriano

Approbations 565

—after Trygve Seim’s Between

 

 

 

Between stare                          stare

blank

opacity

resembles

much

of the broken

semblances

culture contains, intangible mores

focused

finite and inexplicably distant

from consistent virtues of

italicized

beau monde.

 

 

Approbations 566

—after Marc Johnson’s Since you Asked

 

 

 

My silence recalls bland-tongue

architecture,

achromatic

logic containing

prayerful condiments, mutilated connection.  Your asking

contains metaphoric trails, my standing still

of an oaks’ neighborhood of size, style—

 

reanalyzes your truth of committed understanding.

The ideal

would be conversation occurrence

countering the silence

my sound releases

broken

confused meaning of my mind’s innate sepulture.

 

 

Approbations 567

—after Bobo Stenson’s Olivia

 

 

 

Wears interwoven light like shadows

climbing contextual walls of needed

isolation.  Her

alone

retrieves an image of pale, bleached stone

engrained into sand’s warmed appreciation, resting,

 

the curved lightness

of smoothed exterior

does not wish to wander into sea’s language of

unsolved labyrinth.

 

 … Click to continue . . .

Transformations

Transformations

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson. Swedish First Edition.
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson. Swedish First Edition.

Just watched the Swedish film adaptation of the first novel in Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy, and it’s quite good, though very dark, and not for the faint of heart. There is a rumor of an American version coming out in 2012, which seems to be a pattern these days. Another very good Swedish film, “Let the Right One In,” is soon to be a Hollywood production as well, and “Brothers” was recently remade from the Swedish original. A reversal of creative juices is in the air. Bollywood once had a habit of churning out Hollywood movies in new form, but with the success of “Slumdog Millionaire,” I’m guessing the former British colony might do some colonizing on its own. Changes are all around us.

“The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” is a thriller and a murder mystery, with some social commentary and a bit of kick-ass feminism thrown … Click to continue . . .

People are Strange

People are Strange

When You're Strange, a film by Tom DiCillo. 2010
When You’re Strange, a film by Tom DiCillo. 2010

I love the music of The Doors, the times and the legend. Watching archival footage in Tom DiCillo’s Rockdoc, I was taken back to a moment in our history filled with so much hope and promise, yet riven with an overwhelming sense of confusion and loss. Americans were deeply confused about a host of things in the 60s, and just like today, sought long and hard for someone to break on through to the other side.

Morrison was born to be a shaman/showman and blaze new trails.

The film reminded me of a few important details. It’s one of the first biopics to deal at all with the musicianship of the other Doors — Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek and John Densmore. Morrison got all of the attention and notoriety, but they set his voice to music. They also had an almost uncanny ability to keep things together in concert when Mr. … Click to continue . . .