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Month: April 2011

The Immersion Paradox

The Immersion Paradox

Measure for Measure

 

Endless regress of the missing moment
We tune out filter avoid

Run away from

Noise and white noise and buzz and boom
For if we don’t we fold up —

If we don’t we succumb

To that which is not relevant to being
Like dusty animals in the desert searching

For π

Opening ourselves up to the all
We open ourselves up to that noise
That static beat and whomp and flow

Of third-rate minds and fourth-rate
Play by play

To be Zenish to ride the Taoist wave
Is to coast with some Dharma —

But Dharma includes all

All means the center is everywhere
I want  some things off stage

 

— by Douglas Pinson

 

Splitting the Difference

Splitting the Difference

Castle Duino, Italy. Photo by Johann Jaritz

 

 

Elegy For a Lesser God

 

There is a faint noise
In the middle of a field
Beyond the sea line
Above the clashing rocks

No Scylla or Charybdis
Just nature clapping hard

For another beautiful wave

A faint noise in the castle
And a flickering of candle’s light
Draws doves from their resting place

Near the world’s sphere
The world’s globe

The navel of the universe
As seen by the writer
Before he moves away
From the candle and the sea

What is in the mind
What brings the doves circling
Overhead for a taste
Of bread and dreams?

It is not to separate the ego
From the dove or the waves
Or set castle walls against the world
As it is

Kinetic poetry connects
Art connects
Music connects
And the waves know it

 

 

— by Douglas Pinson

 

 

More Egalitaria

More Egalitaria

So, back to Egalitaria.

When last we saw it, it was gleaming in the sun, surrounded by clear, blue-green waters, and covered in forests and farmland, with a few small cities and towns, and no big box stores and no chains of any kind. Chains. That word carries multiple meanings, especially in the age of shareholder corporatism . . .

One of the key distortions in the world today is the way we allocate wages, and the way we value certain kinds of work above others. This creates enormous inequalities and imbalances across the planet, and is the root of social, economic and environmental injustice. Egalitaria would diverge radically from the system currently in place. It would not value work or time the way it is valued in the larger world, beyond the Blessed Isle. It would value all work, and respect personal time, and would not privilege any walk of life. The highest value would be one’s contribution to … Click to continue . . .