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Month: October 2012

Mo Yan Wins Nobel Prize for Literature

Mo Yan Wins Nobel Prize for Literature

Mo Yan. 2008
Mo Yan. 2008

 

 Excerpt from the New York Times:

By SARAH LYALL and ANDREW JACOBS LONDON — Mo Yan, a wildly prolific and internationally renowned Chinese author who considers himself nonpolitical but whose embrace by the ruling Communist Party has drawn criticism from dissident writers, was on Thursday awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize in Literature.

In his novels and short stories, Mr. Mo paints sprawling, intricate portraits of Chinese rural life, often using flights of fancy — animal narrators, the underworld, elements of fairy tales — that evoke the techniques of South American magical realists. His work has been widely translated and is readily available in the West, but he is perhaps best known abroad for “Red Sorghum” (1987; published in English in 1993) which takes on issues like the Japanese occupation, bandit culture and the harsh lives of rural Chinese, and which in 1987 was made into a movie directed by Zhang Yimou.

“Through a mixture of fantasy

Click to continue . . .
The Way of the Harvest

The Way of the Harvest

The James River.

Spinozablue welcomes in the month of October with new poetry from Alessio Zanelli, Kyle Hemmings and Joshua Bocher. Jack Galmitz adds new photo-collages to the fall gathering.  

 

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Hilary Sideris, one of our contributors, has a new book of poems out. It’s called Sweet Flag, and you can purchase it through Finishing Line Press. Congratulations, Hilary!

  Sweet-Flag-352x540

 

Alessio Zanelli: Of Leaps and old Booksellers

Alessio Zanelli: Of Leaps and old Booksellers

White Mulberries

 

One Indian file resists the advance of pylons and smokestacks,
right at the bottom of the hollow between the main embankments.

Forsaken sentries captive at home,
ashy relics of earth, air, water and fire.

This land has forgotten that once it teemed with countless arrays.
They know and strive to last till worms return to claim what’s theirs.

 

Of Leaps And Old Booksellers

 

Did you notice the limper?
It could leap, but hardly walk.
And the beached whale?
What a disgrace! It wanted to be a shell,
for someone to pick up and hold in their hand.
So it leapt onto the shore.
How unfair this world turns out to be.
And Einstein? What did Einstein say?
That space and time are relative?
Inertial observers? What do you know of inertia?
Whoever grasped anything of all that?
Life is made of leaps:
those of faith and those of rashness.
See, in the end the limper … Click to continue . . .

Kyle Hemmings: Manga Girls Still Need Love

Kyle Hemmings: Manga Girls Still Need Love

Manga Girls Need Love! {Under Distant Microscopes}

 

It’s a season of love & odd numbered pairings. At night, the crickets forget the B-side of their songs. You work hard to decode the gravelly voice of the radio DJ, a survivor of throat cancer & his own second-hand smog. The song he plays: The Moon Is Down. It’s the truth, you think. That night, in the stolen warmth of a car’s front seat, your boyfriend remarks that there is no moon, only a shade of blue different from day and some dirty hands. His hands are great deceivers. The back of his tee-shirt reads: Rebels With Lost Teeth. You remind him in your sweet-grungy Lolita voice that you are both under the stars. And the stars are really microscopes and the microscopes are the eyes of jealous trekkers who never found a way back to Planet Tokyo. From the slip of your eye, you notice a white-silver sailboat floating in … Click to continue . . .

Joshua Bocher: Real or Imagined Light

Joshua Bocher: Real or Imagined Light

From Meditative Fragments

 

I.

I don’t like to complain
But I like having
Someone to complain
To

II.

Happy is the husband
Whose wife is beautiful
And few know it

VIII.

There is no dialogue
In television
It never hears
What I have to say

XIII.

In my sleepy stupor,
I can’t solve all
The world’s problems
Or all my own
Or one

XVI.

To be in awe
Of everything
Sounds exhausting

XXI.

To overcome
Overcoming

XXV.

I don’t need to know
What it means — just
The promise of meaning

XXVI.

Unable to see,
Consoled
By any light
Real or imagined

XXVII.

Saying
I had a good day
I did not mean
To brag

XXVIII.

One day
It’ll all make sense

But not
The day after

 

 

— by Joshua Bocher

 

 

Copyright© 2012, by Joshua Bocher. All Rights Reserved.

Joshua Bocher is currently a graduate student at Harvard University doing research on Chinese poetry and … Click to continue . . .