Browsed by
Month: March 2013

Happy Saint Paddy’s Day!!

Happy Saint Paddy’s Day!!

All Standing: The Remarkable Story of the Jeanie Johnston, The Legendary Irish Famine Ship. By Kathryn Miles.
All Standing: The Remarkable Story of the Jeanie Johnston, The Legendary Irish Famine Ship. By Kathryn Miles.

 On this day when everyone is Irish, I think it’s good to remember how many of us got here, what it took, the tragedies overcome and the triumphs at the end of the road. Kathryn Miles has written what sounds like a moving, important book. I caught part of her interview today on NPR:

Brief article with excerpt from the book, here

 

 

 

 

March: On the Cusp

March: On the Cusp

The Lighthouse at Two Lights. By Edward Hopper. 1929
The Lighthouse at Two Lights. By Edward Hopper. 1929

Tis a strange month, March. Both Winter and Spring, cold and temperate, it transitions us from Death to Life, fallow to green. Depending upon the region, depending upon one’s position on this earth, by design or chance, this month will bring us all great changes.

For Spinozablue, March brings us poetry by Virginie Colline, and fiction by Donal Mahoney. For this editor, March takes me closer to the lighthouse, and another rereading of the masterful, brilliant goddess of prose, Virginia Woolf. She brought us closer to lighthouses — metaphorical, fictional and in real time — because she brought us closer to the mind in search of.

 

 

Virginie Colline: Streetlight Tanka

Virginie Colline: Streetlight Tanka

Streetlight Tanka

Lámpagyujtogató by Sándor Bortnyik
Lámpagyujtogató by Sándor Bortnyik

 

Pulse of lights
he hops into a taxi
to wherever she won’t be      
too tall an order
the city whispers

Giant daisies                      
yellow glow
the streetlamps dance
before his very eyes
he kisses them goodnight  

 

Copyright© 2013, by Virginie Colline. All Rights Reserved.

 

Virginie Colline is a French translator living in Paris. You can read her latest poems in Egg, Seltzer, Yes, Poetry, BRICKrhetoric, Overpass Books, Winamop and Mad Swirl, among others.

 

 

Donal Mahoney: Mike Fitzgibbons and His Morning Paper

Donal Mahoney: Mike Fitzgibbons and His Morning Paper

Mike Fitzgibbons and His Morning Paper

 

For 35 years, Mike Fitzgibbons had never missed a day driving off at 4 a.m. to buy the newspaper at his local convenience store. Snow, sleet, hail or rain couldn’t stop him. There was only one paper being published in St. Louis at the time but Mike was addicted to newspapers. He had spent his early years reading four papers a day in Chicago–two in the morning and two in the evening. He worked for one of them and enjoyed every minute of it. However, an opportunity to earn more money as an editor for a defense contractor required his large family’s relocation to St. Louis. Mike needed more money to feed a wife and seven children.

“Words are words,” Mike said at the time. “Being paid more money to arrange words for someone else seems like the right thing to do.”

Writing and editing were the two things in life Mike could … Click to continue . . .