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Month: August 2015

4 Non Blondes: What’s Going On?

4 Non Blondes: What’s Going On?

To avoid any conflict with the song by Marvin Gaye, Linda Perry and company renamed their beautiful, angsty, anthemic (1993) single to “What’s up?” But it’s all about that question from 1971, and about the knowing confusion, the justifiable frustration and alienation of the young. That’s at least how it sounds. One of the original 4 Non Blondes, Christa Hillhouse, says it’s a mistake to read too much into it. Linda was just playing guitar down the hall from Christa when she wrote it, and it was so good, Christa thought, she stopped having sex and ran down the hall to find her. It happened organically, naturally. The song writing. The questioning about that song. Linda Perry was afraid it had come from somewhere else, and asked Christa if she had borrowed some of it from others. And that’s a key. Good to great art often gives the appearance of pre-existence. That it must have always been, even to the … Click to continue . . .

Timbuktu

Timbuktu

Timbuktu. 2014
Timbuktu. 2014

One of the best films of the past year is Timbuktu, directed by Abderrahmene Sissako. Understated, beautifully shot and composed, it tells the story of a village, a people, caught in the arbitrary and repressive grip of a Jihadist takeover. The focus of the film, but never at the cost of the village’s story itself, is a small family on the outskirts of Timbuktu, making a life on the dunes. Kidane, the father, Satima, the mother, their daughter Toya, and the young shepherd, Issan. Perhaps because of their existence on the periphery, this small family had managed to avoid most of the cultural and social repression being arbitrarily imposed on those in the village, but a tragic accident changes all of that.

I was struck by the images, again and again. The incredible beauty of the desert, the dunes, the motion of people crossing them, running on the sand. But, especially, the scene of a soccer game, … Click to continue . . .

Welcome to Spinozablue!

Welcome to Spinozablue!

Joan Miró's Birth of the World. 1925
Joan Miró’s Birth of the World. 1925

The work is done. Rebirth is here. We’re ready, finally, to start adding again to this fine collection of poetry, fiction, reviews, art, photography and film.

Six years of excellent contributions. Then a pause. But that pause has been lifted.

If you’d like to contribute, please click on the submissions page and follow the directions therein. No previous publishing experience is required. All that matters is the quality of the work itself.

Spinozablue promotes an internationalism of the arts and knows no geographical boundaries. Actually, we’re not all that impressed with the idea of boundaries in general. When it comes to the Republic of the Arts, the world is one. We’re open to all of it.

A few notes about the relaunch:

Unlike the first incarnation of Spinozablue, we won’t have comments turned on underneath the articles, though a separate forums section is a likely addition in the future. Technical obstacles in the … Click to continue . . .