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Month: December 2021

Helgoland: Quantum islands in the storm

Helgoland: Quantum islands in the storm

One could quip, “I must have missed that day,” when it comes to a subject or two during high school. Senior year, especially. I was absent physically more than was wise, and even when I did attend math and science classes, my thoughts were often somewhere else. With the sun, the waves, the girls on the beach, or some day-dream about heroic feats in sports, the arts, or racing old cars that had no business being on Thunder Road to begin with. Not unusual for a teen, I suppose — to think life is elsewhere. But there are limits to our wanderings, and contexts and timelines to consider, or so I’m told. 

Centuries later, books lead to other books in rapid order, and the quantum world appears.… Click to Continue “Helgoland: Quantum islands in the storm”

Avery Tuck’s Liminal Permanence

Avery Tuck’s Liminal Permanence

Liminal Permanence

polar nights
bring
magnetic sparrows
in flux

 

ephemeral ruins
of
known faces—
pulled from transience
to
reminisce

 

a hemlock
dances
in purgatory—
to tune,
a congregation
preaches its
innocence

 

— by Avery Tuck


Copyright ©2021, by Avery Tuck. All Rights Reserved.

Avery Tuck is an amateur poet from Nova Scotia, Canada.

Rutger Bregman’s Humankind

Rutger Bregman’s Humankind

It shouldn’t come as any surprise that much of what we’ve been taught about “human nature” is nonsense. We’ve been told for far too long that we’re naturally selfish, greedy, and violent, and there’s just no point in trying to change the world around us. Suggest a better system, one structured to encourage cooperation, sharing, giving, and living in peace, and all too many cynics will laugh and instantly claim it can’t work — because, “human nature.”

Thing is, recent science tells us that our nature is very well suited for just such a society — one that utilizes our natural tendencies toward helping one another, sharing, cooperating, and preferring peace to war. Recent anthropology, archaeology, and other social and natural sciences have also shown that we humans survived to this point largely through cooperation, not competition, not “the survival of the fittest.”… Click to Continue “Rutger Bregman’s Humankind”