Browsed by
Tag: Surrealism

Apollinaire: The Poet and the Bridge

Apollinaire: The Poet and the Bridge

Born in Rome, in 1880, Wilhelm Albert Włodzimierz Apolinary Kostrowicki became one of the most important figures in the history of modernism, likely coining the terms Surrealism and Orphism along the way. Apollinaire, the name he adopted when he moved to France, was a tireless champion of the avant-garde, especially when it came to the cubist movement, painters, poets, composers and writers in general. His own production of poetry, novels and plays was prodigious, though there is still debate as…

Read More Read More

Clarice Lispector’s Agua Viva

Clarice Lispector’s Agua Viva

Yes, it’s even better than The Passion. Why? Because the aphorisms here do not push for a certain resolution. They are what they are. More at ease with themselves. They are it, as she says repeatedly. It being something so essential, so real, so basic, that it defies naming beyond it. It just is. The work is short. Too short. Just 88 pages. Edited posthumously by Olga Borelli and newly translated by Stefan Tobler. But it can and should be…

Read More Read More

Murakami’s Uncanny Doors of Perception

Murakami’s Uncanny Doors of Perception

 One of the most consistently interesting writers of the last twenty years is Haruki Murakami, the Japanese dynamo whose novels defy categorization. Well, actually, they can be categorized under a rubric all their own. Murakamism, let’s say. By that I mean . . . the strange and surreal dislocation of humans and their interactions approaching the gateway. The gateway being the door into or out of another dimension, a hidden world, for a moment.   In most of his novels,…

Read More Read More