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New Poetry by Robert Mueller and Desi Di Nardo

New Poetry by Robert Mueller and Desi Di Nardo

Robert Mueller has graced our pages before, and in his latest, takes what seems to be a new direction. The rhythm and mood is Shakespearean. But the word mix is a la Language Poetry.

Desi Di Nardo has also graced these pages before, and she has a new book coming out. From Guernica’s blub:

 

The Cure is a Forest by Desi Di Nardo
An element of animism permeates the poems, set in and against the backdrop of Canada’s ecotones, taking us from the city and industry into both the past and the possible.

The Launch Party is April 3rd. For more information, visit this website: Guernica Editions

 

 

Toronto: Poetry Event in November

Toronto: Poetry Event in November

Annex Style home, University of Toronto Campus. Photo by SimonP
Annex Style home, University of Toronto Campus. Photo by SimonP

For those of you living in Canada, or thinking about a visit, Desis Di Nardo sends this invitation. It sounds like a great gathering:

 

I want to let you know about a poetry event I will be co-hosting with Canada’s Poet Laureate – Pierre DesRuisseaux on Sunday, November 8, 2009 at 7 p.m. There will be readings by Pierre DesRuisseaux, Max Layton, Armand Garnet Ruffo, and Toronto’s new Poet Laureate – Dionne Brand. In addition, the night will feature live jazz, an art exhibit, and the winners of a high school poetry contest. Details can be found below.

Poetry Parade
Sunday November 8, 2009 at 7 pm
The Annex Live (296 Brunswick Avenue – just south of Bloor Street).

*Pierre DesRuisseaux
*Dionne Brand
*Max Layton
*Armand Garnet Ruffo

*Music: Local Jazz duo Norm Amadio & Julie McGregor

*Artwork: Canadian landscape art pieces by Mario Ricci

*High School Poetry Contest: sponsored by Book City in the Annex

I hope to see you at the event!

Warmly,
Desi

 

Being in Time

Being in Time

Yves Tanguy's Indefinite Divisibilty. 1943
Yves Tanguy’s Indefinite Divisibilty. 1943

For those of you north of the border, for those of you planning to take a trip to Canada soon, Desi Di Nardo has a poetic treat in store. On Wednesday, May 13th, she will be holding a workshop/reading at 7:00pm.

The location is:

The McNally Robinson Bookstore

Don Mills Road at Lawrence Avenue East
12 Marie Labatte Road
Toronto, Ontario
M3C 3R6

(416) 384-0084

From the bookstore’s announcement:

Desi Di Nardo is an author and poet living in Toronto whose work has been published in numerous North American and international journals and anthologies. Her poetry has been performed at the National Arts Centre, featured in Poetry on the Way on the TTC, and displayed in the Official Residences of Canada. Desi’s poems have also been studied in schools across the country, translated into several languages, and printed on Starbucks cups. She has also worked as an English professor at George Brown College and Writer-in-Residence Loretto College.

*     *     *     *     *

I’ve been thinking a lot about missing things. Missing key, essential, historical moments. Especially firsts. The first time Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane played together. The first time Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie played together. The first time a small group of people heard those notes of genius. The very first time . . .

 

 

It wasn’t mass produced. It wasn’t packaged or preordained, that first time. It happened, much like the improv on display. It happened without being rigged, hyped, marketed, tagged, billed, bottled, or seized by people with dollar signs in their heads.

 

Art exploding without preconditions. Smooth. Sweet. Effortless. But oh they worked hard to be so effortless.

Recordings. We have those. Though some of the best moments were never recorded. Some of those firsts. Then take it on back through time and you had to be there. You had to be in that room, in time with their time, their rhythm, their cool. Not watching it on TV, or the Internet. But in the bar, that particular bar, where the right girl said the right thing and you smiled and you just knew the musicians smiled with you and for you. Being in time and saying, oh, man, what a time!

 

The Plural of Desi

The Plural of Desi

The Plural of Some Things, by Desi Di Nardo
The Plural of Some Things, by Desi Di Nardo

Desi Di Nardo, who has graced our site with her wonderful poetry, has a new book coming out soon.
From the book blurb:
Title: THE PLURAL OF SOME THINGS
Author: Desi Di Nardo
Format: Trade Paperback
Published: December 1, 2008
Dimensions: 75 Pages, 5 x 8 x 0 in
Publisher: Guernica Editions
ISBN: 9781550712964
To purchase The Plural of Some Things: click here
The Plural of Some Things illuminates the subtle and poignant flashes of experience which shape the way we evolve and flourish and from time to time digress as human beings. Written with a probingly sensitive eye and a profound fervour for the natural world, The Plural of Some Things invites the reader to journey towards those encumbered truths embedded deep in the heart’s home.
 
Reviews:

*Desi Di Nardo’s energetic and exquisite poetry is already a major force, and a distinctive universal voice.       — Sheema Kalbasi
*If one is seeking poetry that is fresh and insightful, this little book of gems will not disappoint. Desi Di Nardo’s poems impress instantly. Each one offers a transforming look at a facet of seemingly ordinary experience. Desi is one of my favourite poets writing in Canada today.     — Denis Deneau
*How refreshing to find a writer so unabashedly poetic as Desi Di Nardo. In a world of politicized screeching and lament, one is reminded of Pablo Neruda’s definition of art as that which “gives people hope”. By that definition Di Nardo stands head and shoulders above the mob of academic sirens and macho wailers. A poetry to be thankful for.
— Pier Giorgio Di Cicco

 
Bio:
Desi Di Nardo is a poet and author in Toronto, Canada whose work has been published in numerous North American and international journals. Her poetry has been performed in Canada’s National Arts Centre, featured in Poetry on the Way on Toronto’s transit system, selected by the Parliamentary Poet Laureate, and displayed in the Official Residences of Canada. Desi’s poems have also been presented in schools across the country, translated into foreign languages, and printed on Starbucks cups. Visit www.desidinardo.ca
 
 

New Additions and Digressions

New Additions and Digressions

Yongzheng Emperor and Deer. China. 1723-1735
Yongzheng Emperor and Deer. China. 1723-1735

Want to point to the new poetry below by Aleksandar Novakovich and a return visit by Desi Di Nardo. Strong poets from the Balkans and Canada, respectively. Please comment on their works and let them know your impressions.

* * * * *

Now, for that digression. Albeit brief. I recently heard an interesting fact on the radio. Deer like the grass on the side of the road because it is more loaded with certain kinds of nutrients they need. It’s loaded with that nutrition primarily because we mow the grass along side our roads continuously. Deer are attracted to that grass, and can’t really judge the speed of cars on the highway. Hence the accidents. In addition, the months of October and November is their time to get ready for the Winter, to fatten up, to prepare. It’s also their time to mate. Deer are also most likely to be on the move at dawn or dusk. Always be careful, but especially careful during those hours, and please allow for plenty of space between you and the car in front of you. For obvious reasons.

Why do I bring this up? My journey later today. My journey back into the mountains on my way to the falls. I’m doing this mostly for the spirit, but also for the photos. I want to capture the leaves as they change and fall, capture the water as it drops down the side of the cliff and into subsequent pools, and find some new meaning in the rocks, the trees, the wind and sun. Testing myself against the cliff side, I want to hike up the steep incline, push onward and upward until I can see everything. I want to catch a fawn somewhere between trees, catch it before it darts away, fearing the beast it sees. Snap a picture before I snap a twig. Deer have always mystified and intrigued me, ever since I first read Celtic myths and found that image of a messenger from the other side. The other side. If you follow them long enough . . .

Deer were once something else. They once were beautiful maidens, nymphs and princesses. But an age of disbelief stopped their changeling ways. An age where the divine was removed from nature, from the earth, from flora and fauna alike. They can no longer go back. They can no longer take us with them to the other side, unless we throw off the shackles of our disbelief. Unless we see the divine in all things.

Will post the pictures soon.

 

 

 

Beautiful Vagabonds, by Desi Di Nardo

Beautiful Vagabonds, by Desi Di Nardo


Beautiful Vagabonds

I am not the piston in the flower or The bulging seed throttled by pollen But a separate figure expectant and Cupped by the shape palms make Holding sumptuously to the fragile Killings – crickets, bees, and moths The soulful water strider apparently Impervious to deep mirrored waters And the lotus lilies rooted in mire Look up at me Look into me I am the wind-loving swallow Lighter than the air itself Rippling my whole transience Renascent by the threat of rain
– by Desi Di Nardo

 

 

Previously published in the September 2008 Arts & Culture issue of Our Neighbourhood Magazine.

 

Desi Di Nardo’s work has been published in numerous North American and international journals and anthologies, performed at the National Arts Centre, featured in Poetry on the Way on the Toronto Transit Commission, selected by Canada’s Parliamentary Poet Laureate, and displayed in the Official Residences of Canada. See www.desidinardo.com

 

Copyright ©2008, by Desi Di Nardo. All Rights Reserved.

Desi Di Nardo: Why We Make Art

Desi Di Nardo: Why We Make Art

 

When I stumbled on oil pastels several years ago after not having had any formal background or training in art, I surprisingly found myself enjoying working strictly in this medium. I am most intrigued not only by its texture, fluidity, and vibrancy of colour but also with the dimension and depth which can be readily achieved through simple hand and finger smudging. In this way, being so closely connected physically with the paper, I find myself able to become even more deeply immersed in the work.

 

Several of my favourite artists include Leonardo da Vinci, Tamara de Lempicka, and the Group of Seven artists. My greatest influence, however, is Edgar Degas mainly because of his discerning eye for the human form and his masterful portrayal of movement in dance mode. After taking classical ballet at the National Ballet School of Canada for some years, I became very interested in the elements of speed, grace, and strength–all aspects very much part of the rigorous and demanding dance.

  I am also quite fascinated by Degas’ ability to intensely concentrate so many of his paintings and drawings on a passion and love for another art form, that being ballet. It is almost as if the two means feed off each other to form a mutual rapport–each stimulating and enlivening the other for its own separate growth.

 

I expect this is true in my personal experience as well, as art is really only a small indulgence that oftentimes acts as an outlet too with the offshoot benefit of providing inspiration and focus for my writing career. In fact, much of what I write contains similar undertones which exist in my paintings as the recurring themes of nature, spirituality, and humanity are present in both.  

 –Desi Di Nardo

 

Desi Di Nardo’s work has been published in numerous North American and international journals and anthologies, performed at the National Arts Centre, featured in Poetry on the Way on the Toronto Transit Commission, selected by Canada’s Parliamentary Poet Laureate, and displayed in the Official Residences of Canada. See www.desidinardo.com

 

Copyright ©2008, Desi Di Nardo and Spinozablue. All Rights Reserved.

 

New Poetry From Canada

New Poetry From Canada

We have some new poetry from Desi Di Nardo, a multi-talented and accomplished artist and writer from Toronto. Desi brings her unique voice and sense of rhythm and imagery to spinozablue.

As can be seen by the paintings on her website, Desi has been influenced by Degas. I thought it appropriate to post one of his best known works.

The Rehearsal, by Edgar Degas. 1873
The Rehearsal, by Edgar Degas. 1873

 

 The painting resides in Harvard’s Fogg Art Museum, when not on loan. A good intro and searchable index can be found here.

The Met has a nice online section on Degas here.